CFP / UPCOMING ISSUES


Book Reviews

We also accept artwork, exhibition reviews, and conference reports for future issues.  If you would like to be considered for future reviews, please send an email, including your name; academic/professional affiliation, department and position; and a list of your current research or areas of interest to the editors at ulmertextshop@gmail.com.  You are welcome to select 1-3 titles from the list of received books listed below. This list will be updated every two weeks. While we do accept unsolicited reviews and artwork, artists and reviewers are encouraged to query the editors before submission. 

Books Received

Berland, Jody. Virtual Menageries: Animals as Mediators in Network Cultures (MIT Press, 2019).

Browner, Tara and Thomas L. Riis, ed. Rethinking American Music (University of Illinois Press, 2019).

Burrow, Colin. Imitating Authors: Plato to Futurity (Oxford University Press, 2019).

Camlot, Jason. Phono-poetics: The Making of Early Literary Recordings (Stanford University Press, 2019).

Cooper, Marilyn M. The Animal Who Writes: A Posthumanist Composition (University of Pittsburgh Press, 2019).

Dinnen, Zara. The Digital Banal: New Media and American Literature and Culture (Columbia University Press, 2018).

Dobson, James E. Critical Digital Humanities: The Search for a Methodology (University of Illinois Press, 2019).

Eve, Martin Paul. Close Readings with Computers: Textual Scholarship, Computational Formalism and David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas (Stanford University Press, 2019).

Gray-Rosendale, Laura, ed. Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age (SUNY Press, 2018).

Gutiérrez, Miren. Data Activism and Social Change (Palgrave, 2018).

Henry, Casey Michael. New Media and the Transformation of Postmodern American Literature (Bloomsbury, 2019).

Koehler, Adam. Composition, Creative Writing Studies, and the Digital Humanities (Bloomsbury, 2017).

Licht, Alan. Sound Art Revisited (Bloomsbury, 2019).

Maxwell, Jason. The Two Cultures of English: Literature, Composition, and the Moment of Rhetoric (Fordham University Press, 2019).

Nass, Michael. Plato and the Invention of Life (Fordham University Press, 2018).

Ossa-Richardson, Anthony. A History of Ambiguity (Princeton University Press, 2019).

O’Sullivan, James. Towards a Digital Poetics: Electronic Literature & Literary Games (Palgrave, 2019).

Richter, Gerhard. Thinking with Adorno: The Uncoercive Gaze (Fordham University Press, 2019).

Roberts, Ben and Mack Goodall, ed. Media Archaeologies (Amsterdam University Press, 2019).

Tietchen, Todd F. Techno-Modern Poetics: The American Literary Avant-Garde at the Start of the Information Age (University of Iowa Press, 2018).


Issue 6: Open Issue

Textshop Experiments invites submissions for its special double-issue Vol. 6, beginning February 1.  This is a rolling issue, and submissions will be accepted until August 31, 2019.

Textshop Experiments is an open-access, peer- reviewed journal focused on electracy; experiments in writing and modality; digital media and information literacy; and reflections on philosophy, education, and cultural studies in the digital age.  We are open to all forms, modes, trials in reading, writing and teaching.

This issue is open to all topics, but we will also introduce topical sections related to Poetry, Lists, Office Spaces, Pedagogy & Student Work, and Reviews. 

Poetry & Poetics

Poetics is an intricate part of electracy.  This section offers contributors a chance to reflect on the ways in which artists, writers, and educators can recognize, appropriate, redesign, and (re)invent practices for the digital age.  This section will also publish original poetry, translations, creative-criticism.

Lists

In his essay “I’ve Got a Little List,” William Gass writes, “Listing is a fundamental literary strategy. It occurs constantly, and only occasionally draws attention to itself.”  Inspired by lists found in some of our favorite writers (Homer, Charles Dickens, James Joyce, Gertrude Stein, Georges Perec, Italo Calvino, Umberto Eco, Joan Didon, Susan Sontag, etc., etc.), the editors invite contributors to share their own lists, catalogs, inventories, schedules, registers, tallies, syllabi, almanacs, tables, indexes, calendars, ledgers, scrolls, receipts, invoices, prospectus, menus, memorabilia, directories, and lexica.  Send us your lists!

Office Spaces

“Office Spaces” is a new photo/essay section.  This year, we ask contributors to send a photo or photos of their favorite “work” space and contribute a short 300-500-word essay along with the photo. 

Pedagogy & Student Work

Essays in this section will describe a teaching assignment or method (or a series of assignments and methods) designed for the Internet or digital studies or working in some idea or dimension of electracy, with student examples or comments to illustrate the approach.  Examples of activities, reading lists and resources, or a syllabus might be useful additions here.  We will also consider publishing original student work that draws from recent courses or a series of student works with an introduction provided by the instructor.

Reviews

We will accept reviews of books, films, conferences, and exhibitions.  Those interested in submitting a review are encouraged to contact the editors ahead of time.

We are happy to receive queries and proposals, as well as completed works.

 
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Issue 7: Open Issue 

The editors invite submissions for Volume 7 beginning September 1.  The deadline for submissions is set at December 1, 2019.

This issue is open to all topics related to electracy, digital media and culture, and experiments and pedagogy in the Digital Humanities. We especially encourage essays and videos that address the following topics:

  • Immigration and Adaptation


  • Race, Ethnicity, and Identity


  • Sex, Gender, and Identity


  • Narratives of War, Violence, and Poverty

  • Environmental Humanities and Ecocriticism

  • Discourses on Career, Family, Entertainment or Community

  • Science and the Humanities


  • Technical Communication and User Engagement


  • Storytelling and Cultural Belonging


  • Art and Identity


  • The Humanities and Public Engagement

  • The Arts and Scholarship as Intervention

Volume 7 will also introduce a new special section on Heuretics. This section arrives as we celebrate the 25th Anniversary for the publication of Gregory Ulmer’s book of the same name. We will also continue sections on Poetry & Poetics, Conference Reports, and Book and Exhibition Reviews.

Heuretics

This special section is dedicated to both heuretics (the invention of logic) and Heuretics, Greg Ulmer’s 1994 monograph. We will accept works that respond to, extend, and engage with Ulmer’s descriptions of the practice, but we are also interested in narratives and products that have resulted from your own experiments. Since Eureka! is often associated with the heuretics method, we are also interested in receiving personal accounts of those “AH-HA!” moments, both in your research and beyond. Finally, we welcome submissions that address how you create situations in the classroom that allow students to explore, discover, create, and invent.

Poetry & Poetry

Poetics is an intricate part of electracy.  This section offers contributors a chance to reflect on the ways in which artists, writers, and educators can recognize, appropriate, redesign, and (re)invent practices for the digital age.  This section will also publish original poetry, translations, creative-criticism.

Reviews

We will accept reviews of books, films, conferences, and exhibitions.  Those interested in submitting a review are encouraged to contact the editors ahead of time. A list of available books is available at the top of the page.

Textshop Experiments is an open-access, peer- reviewed journal focused on electracy; experiments in writing and modality; digital media and information literacy; and reflections on philosophy, education, and cultural studies in the digital age.  We are open to all forms, modes, trials in reading, writing and teaching.

The deadline for submissions is December 1, 2019.

 
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Issue 8: Konsult

Coming Soon …


Upcoming Issues & How to Get Involved

We have an exciting line-up of themed and open issues coming up, including

  • Post-Publishing

  • Textshop 10: Tissues 2.0

  • Renku (連句)

  • STAND-UP: The Comedy Issue

  • Anti-Method: Cats or CATTts

More information will be provided soon . . . Textshop Experiments is always seeking ideas for upcoming issues.  If you have a suggestion or are interested in serving as a guest editor, please contact the editors via the Contact page. 

We are also interested in producing/publishing/collaborating in longer digital works and are in the early stages of an original pamphlet/chapbook series.  Individuals interested in learning more should contact the editors directly.